Sleeping Beauties (& Beasts)...

I thought it apt with the recent re-opening of the Alfa Romeo Museum in Milan that I should do a post on the cars that haven’t quite made it into the shiny museum showrooms. The Archivio Storico (Museum Archives) have an extensive collection that is kept out of sight. I would dearly love to tour this facility some time but alas it is a difficult proposition. In this basement is all manner of Alfa Romeo rarities and wonder. There are many forlorn concept cars, experimental engines, and very rare models all gathering dust. Some of the prototypes are integral to Alfa Romeo’s success, like the Tipo 103. I sit with my mouth agog as I look at the haphazard piles of super rare parts just piled on each other on the shelves. Just to name a few in these photos, you can see a 6C2300B, 8C 2300, Tipo 103, Arna, Montreal Prototype, Carabo, 164 Procar, Alfetta Rally car, Tipo 33 Stradale These images were courtesy of...

Museum Montreal Engine...

My friend Scott recently visited the newly refurbished Alfa Romeo Museum in Milan. While he was there he asked me if I needed any images in particular. Well since my latest project is a Montreal I eagerly requested many photos of the Montreal on display as well as the engine that is mounted on a stand. For your viewing pleasure here are the engine photos. Stay tuned to Scott’s website : www.enablieri.com for many more amazing photos of the Museum’s...

Junk in the Trunk- an Alfa edition...

Alfa Romeo have a long history of not only building sporting sedans and coupes but making a practical car that can be used for everyday tasks. The fact that I used to drive my 1966 Giulia Super to work in peak hour traffic very comfortably is testament to this. If you scroll through these pictures you will see how capable these cars are of carrying large amounts of luggage or small asian children… There are many testimonies on the forum of having fully loaded Alfas and going on long comfortable, fast drives! The current Alfa 4C unfortunately can’t carry much more than your gym bag, but I am sure it is a hoot!  ...

Sprint GT Grille For Sale...

SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLD SOLD  Here is a rare Sprint GT grille that I have been hoarding away for a few years. These grilles are very delicate and often missing. Alfaholics attempted a repro one but it looks nothing like the original profile and costs over $1300US. This grille does have imperfections which I have tried to highlight in the photos. Its missing a couple of studs on the back which should be easy to replace, there were two small repairs to the vertical backing supports near the top centre of the grille which I have tried to show in the pics. There is also a crack on one slat. These grilles usually pit heavily but this one is actually very good! I think due to the fact that it had been painted black at some stage…  One of the small sides is pitted but the other small side is very good. I haven’t attempted to clean the back and there are still some small specks of paint here and there. Would present nicely for a driver or an excellent candidate for rechroming due to limited pitting. Price is $400US for this complete grille plus postage worldwide from...

Get off my car. I’m serious!...

Why do we let women stand on our Alfas! GET OFF!!! The sheet metal ain’t that strong! Sure, you are pretty, but you can look pretty standing NEXT TO my car. And yes, I know including the Arna is a stretch for...

The Golden Era of Racing...

Here are a few of my favourite period racing photos. I love how the spectactors are part of the atmosphere. The pits and garages are downright rudimentary, and the courses were a real test for drivers to adapt to their conditions. The brilliant road races of the golden age made for some spectacular scenery ( Targa Florio was run on 93 miles (150 km) of Sicilian roads). Many drivers would drive to the race, and then paint their number on the side with a big paint brush! Racing was about testing yourself and machine and of course bragging rights. Many would agree that the heart of racing has been removed in recent decades when it became about sponsorship, advertising and monetary gains. Safety rules may have also ironically killed off the colourfulness of racing….  ...

1966 Giulia Super Australian Road Test...

I have quite the collection of period advertisements and road tests for the Giulia Super. This particular one is a favourite. It was done for ‘Australian Hot Rod’ Magazine! The Giulia’s performance and specs were pretty impressive back in the day. Enjoy the read, with quotes like this it makes you smile to know that Alfa got it so right.  “… as we were travelling down the road at 50 m.p.h., I said. “seems to rev a bit in top,” I felt perfectly justified. “You’re joking,” says Lock, “we’re still in second and this is a five-speed box.” I said nothing. Just sat there and hung on,…” “So now I was beginning to realise. This was no ordinary little car. I fact, there was nothing ordinary about it at all. Performance, handling, braking, this car had them all, and then...

Pomigliano d’Arco Plant...

In the late 60’s there were two Alfa Romeo production plants. Both were located in the region around Milan, Portello the original plant and Arese the newer mass production tooled plant. It was decided by the Italian government, who was at the time the owner of Alfa Romeo  that a factory in the south (sud) was needed to encourage development in southern Italy and stop the mass exodus to the North in search of jobs as northern Italy was where all the action was. The then president of Alfa Romeo, Joseph Luraghi, opposed this direction but it was decided to be in the nation’s best interests. The factory was to be  located in the town of Pomigliano d’Arco in the Campania region in the south of Italy. There was already a factory on the site that had been responsible for producing aeronautical engines, this was cleared to make way for the new plant. In April 1972 Alfa Romeo’s new factory began production.  This new model polarised many Alfa Romeo fans as it was a revolutionary front wheel drive and was named the Alfa Sud (south) because of the region in which it was built. (More on the AlfaSud car next week). The plant was developed under the direction of Rudolf Hruska who was the designer of the AlfaSud. The styling was by Giorgetto Giugiaro of ItalDesign The production of the AlfaSud continued til 1989 and was nearly 900000 cars! Unfortunately due to poor materials and some bad design in regards to trapping water, most of these have returned to the earth from whence they came! The last Alfa Romeo to be produced here was the 159 which finished production late last year. The factory will now produce Fiat...

Why an Alfa Romeo? (Official Answer)...

Do you ever get asked “What would you want one of them for?” when you mention to somebody that you drive a classic Alfa Romeo? Apart from the fact that it is hard to wipe the smile off your face from the sheer enjoyment, this little sales card that I have lists a few of the technical features that make our cars superior to its contemporaries....